IRS 2013 and 2014 Tax Tables (Federal Income Tax Rates)

The following article contains information about the federal income tax rates for 2011, 2012, and 2013.

  • Use 2013 rates to prepare and file your 2013 tax return in early 2014.
  • Use 2014 rates to plan for 2014 tax year.

To the extent that the information in this article helps summarize the changes in Federal Income Tax, you should consult the official IRS.gov web site and a professional tax advisor as needed.

Federal Tax Rates Schedule For Tax 2012, 2013, 2014 Years

The table below gives you the marginal tax brackets for single, married couples filing jointly, qualifying widowers, married filing separately, head of household, as well as the long-term capital gains and qualified dividend tax rates. The income numbers listed are taxable incomes, and thus they have taken into consideration all available personal exemptions as well as any of either the standard or itemized deductions.

2014 Federal Income Tax Brackets

Income Tax Single Married Filing Jointly /
Qualifying Widower
Married Filing Separately Head of Household LTCG/
QD*
Rate over up to over up to over up to over up to Rate
10% 0 9,075 0 18,150 0 9,075 0 12,950 0%
15% 9,076 36,900 18,151 73,800 9,076 36,900 12,951 49,400 0%
25% 36,901 89,350 73,801 148,850 36,901 74,425 49,401 127,550 15%
28% 89,351 186,350 148,851 226,850 74,426 113,425 127,551 206,600 15%
33% 186,351 405,100 226,851 405,100 113,426 202,550 206,601 405,100 15%
35% 405,101  406,750 405,101  457,600 202,551  228,800 405,101   432,200 15%
39.6% 406,751  457,601  228,801  432,201 20%

In addition to these income tax rates, a 3.8% net investment income surtax applies to some taxpayers if adjusted gross income exceeds certain thresholds.

  • $150,000 for Married Filing Separately
  • $200,000 for Single or Head of Household
  • $250,000 for Married Filing Jointly or Qualifying Widow(er)

Plus an additional Medicare surtax of 0.9% on wages or net-self employment income above certain thresholds.

  • $150,000 for Married Filing Separately
  • $200,000 for Single or Head of Household or Qualifying Widow(er)
  • $250,000 for Married Filing Jointly

* Long-Term Capital Gains and Qualified Dividend

2013 Federal Income Tax Brackets

For 2013, there are a few noteworthy changes:

  • Social security tax goes back up from 4.2% to 6.2% for everyone.
  • A new 39.6% bracket is added for high income earners.
  • A new 20% long-term capital gains and qualified dividend tax rate is added for high income earners.
  • Medicare tax for wage earnes stay the same at 2.9%, but increases to 3.8% for wage income in excess of $200,000.
  • A new 3.8% Medicare tax on unearned income.
Income Tax Single Married Filing Jointly /
Qualifying Widower
Married Filing Separately Head of Household LTCG/
QD*
Rate over up to over up to over up to over up to Rate
10% 0 8,925 0 17,850 0 8,925 0 12,750 0%
15% 8,925 36,250 17,850 72,500 8,925 36,250 12,750 48,600 0%
25% 36,250 87,850 72,500 146,400 36,250 73,200 48,600 125,450 15%
28% 87,850 183,250 146,400 223,050 73,200 111,525 125,450 203,150 15%
33% 183,250 398,350 223,050 398,350 111,525 199,175 203,150 398,350 15%
35% 398,350  400,000 398,350  450,000 199,175  225,000 398,350   425,000 15%
39.6% 400,000  450,000  225,000  425,000 20%

2012 Federal Income Tax Brackets

Income Tax Single Married Filing Jointly /
Qualifying Widower
Married Filing Separately Head of Household LTCG/
QD*
Rate over up to over up to over up to over up to Rate
10% 0 8,700 0 17,400 0 8,700 0 12,400 0%
15% 8,700 35,350 17,400 70,700 8,700 35,350 12,400 47,350 0%
25% 35,350 85,650 70,700 142,700 35,350 71,350 47,350 122,300 15%
28% 85,650 178,650 142,700 217,450 71,350 108,725 122,300 198,050 15%
33% 178,650 388,350 217,450 388,350 108,725 194,175 198,050 388,350 15%
35% 388,350 388,350 194,175 388,350 15%

The numbers for previous years are also provided below to let you see the changes.

How to Calculate Your Tax Liability

Let’s take a moment to show you how to calculate your Federal income tax liability so that you can better understand how tax brackets work. Let’s look at the following example using 2012 rates, suppose your taxable income (after deductions and exemptions) is exactly $100,000 and your status is Single; then your tax would be calculated like this:

( $8,700 minus $0 ) x 10% = $870.00
( $35,350 minus $8,700 ) x 15% = $3,997.50
( $85,650 minus $35,350 ) x 25% = $12,575.00
( $100,000 minus $85,650 ) x 28% = $4,018.00
Total: $ 21,460.50

The $100,000 taxable income puts you in the 28% tax bracket, since that’s the highest rate applied to any of your income; but your effective tax rate as a percentage of $100,000 is 21.46%. Comparing 2011 tax rates, you are paying $156.50 less tax in 2012 for the same income.

Although the information in this article helps summarize the changes in Federal Income Tax, you should consult the official IRS.gov web site and a professional tax advisor as needed.

About the Author

By , on Dec 1, 2013
Pinyo
Pinyo is the owner of Moolanomy Personal Finance. He is a licensed Realtor specializing in residential homes in the Northern Virginia area. Over the past 20 years, Pinyo has enjoyed a diverse career as an investor, entrepreneur, business executive, educator, and financial literacy author.

2013 Tax Center

important dates
2013 Important Tax and Filing Dates

Leave Your Comment (5 Comments)

  1. Brenda says:

    Hello, I am a 63 yr old single female. I would like to start working part time, and supplementing my income with my 401k. Im trying to figure out how to do so, while keeping my Taxes in check.
    I would like to be able to have a $4000-$4500.00, Monthly Net amount. I think if I bring home around 3500.00 monthly and withdraw $3,000 from my 401k Monthly, I can pay my taxes and purchase a supplemental health insurance policy. To calculate I used a $6000. Gross Income x 30% tax minus a health Premium. Is this the correct way to calculate my taxes?
    I have looked and looked on line for guidance in this matter as well as who to seek out for guidance. I only see information on penalties on Taking my 401 withdrawals. No help for my situation . Any light you can shed would be so appreciated!! My 401 is with a previous employer

  2. Smarkis P. Elias says:

    I withdrew from a local Bank the whole of my Traditional IRA, which is $67884.21 with a check that is still in my position. a)Can I deposit $37,884.21 into my Savings Account? and invest $30000.00 in another IRA? Or, b) Can I cash the whole amount?
    The question is, how much Tax I have to pay in each case?
    I am a single man, 82 years old. Do I have to pay any penalty? Thank you, very much.

    • Pinyo says:

      @Smarkis – You’re 82 years old, so there is no penalty. The amount that is not deposited into a tax-deferred account will be subject to taxes at your current income tax rates (federal and local).

  3. Kent McMillen says:

    I want to pay 14% rate, like Mitt Romney!

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