5 Ways to Dramatically Improve Your Business Profitability

Many businesses are suffering as this recession prolongs. As a business owner, you may be looking for ways to improve your cash flow and ultimately the profitability of your business. Unfortunately, many people stop short at the income versus expenses equation and never dig deeper — resulting in missed opportunities. In this article, I will show you five small ideas, that when you added together could provide you with a significant result.

Can You Double The Profitability Of Your Business?

If I ask you whether or not it’s possible to double your profit, most of you will answer NO — especially not in this economy. However, I want to show you some plausible numbers for a theoretical business (see below), and demonstrate how little things do add up to help you achieve the big result you’re looking for.

Here is the table with some monthly data:

Description Current #s % Inc. Target #s
Leads 4,000 20% 4,800
Conversion Rate 50.0% 15% 57.5%
Total New Customers 2,000 2,760
Returning Customers 250 20% 300
Total Paying Customers 2,250 3,060
Revenue Per Customer $100 15% $115
Total Revenue $225,000 $351,900
Total Cost (as % of Revenue) 65% 15% 55.25%
Total Cost ($) $146,250 $194,425
Net Profit $78,750 $157,475

Here’s a copy of the table in Google Docs Spreadsheet so you can plug in your own numbers.

The table above simply demonstrate how a theoretical business could double its monthly profit by making 15-20% improvement in 5 business areas: Leads, Conversion Rate, Returning Customers, Revenue per Customer, and Cost.

Isn’t that amazing?

Do you believe that you can improve these 5 factors within your business by 15-20% each?

1. Leads

Every business, whether traditional or online, needs a steady stream of potential customers. This involves expanding your reach and increasing interests in products and services you have to offer. How can you expand your reach and increase interests? Some ideas include:

  • Offer something for FREE
  • Offer toll-free number where they can call 24/7
  • Leveraging different mediums — e.g., print, TV, radio, online, etc.
  • Broadening your geographic market
  • Expanding your distribution channels. If you can’t expand on your own, look for people who will help you sell your products and services for a fee.

Basically, do what it takes to gain more mind share and interests.

In the example above, we increased the number of leads per month by 20% from 4,000 to 4,800.

2. Conversion Rate

Now that you’ve got their attention, you have to turn them from a potential customer to a paying customer. What can you do to improve your conversion rate? Some ideas include:

  • More effective sales and marketing techniques
  • Better store arrangement (or web site layout) to make products / services more appealing. Do you know that supermarkets put more profitable products at eye level?
  • Offer money back satisfaction guarantee
  • Remove barriers — e.g., streamline your sale process, make it easier for them to pay you, etc.

In the example above, we increased the conversion rate by 15% from 50% to 57.5%. This results in total new customers of 2,000 versus 2,760 — a cumulative improvement of 38%.

3. Returning Customers

It’s proven that it costs businesses less to sell to their existing customers than to new ones. What can you do to sell more to your existing customers? Well, the most important thing is to deliver what you promised the first time. If you pissed them off the first time, they won’t buy from you again — simple, right?

Here are some more ideas to sell more to your existing customers:

  • Start a mailing list so you can tell them about new offers and remind them that you exist
  • Make your services subscription-based so you can continue charging monthly or annually
  • Make sure they are happy the first time — yes, this one is worth repeating!

In the example above, we increased the returning by 20% from 250 to 300. This results in total paying customers of 2,250 versus 3,060 — a cumulative improvement of 36%.

4. Revenue Per Customer

Now that you’ve increased the number of paying customers, let’s focus on earning more from each one. If you have a restaurant business, you’ll know this factor well. This is one reason why waiters and waitresses tells you about the specials first, then take order for drinks, appetizers, entrees, and desserts in rounds. Since restaurants capacities are limited, one of the best ways for them to increase revenue is by increasing sales per customer.

What can you do to increase sale? There are many tactics, for example:

  • Add value to your products or services so you can charge more
  • Create premium products or services to cater to customers who want to spend more
  • Offer buy 1 get, 2nd for 50% off specials
  • Offer bulk discount specials

In the example above, we increased the revenue per customer by 15% from $100 to $115. This results in total revenue of $225,000 versus $351,900 — a cumulative improvement of 56%.

5. Costs

Now that you improved your revenue, make sure you don’t forget your expenses. Controlling your expenses is an important part of the equation, and a small change can dramatically affect your overall profitability.

What can you do to reduce your costs? Here are some ideas:

  • Streamline your products and services so you’re focusing on the most profitable parts of your business
  • Outsource non-critical portions of your business
  • Negotiate with your vendors and supplies for better rates
  • Reduce your inventory

In the example above, we reduced the expenses by 15% from 65% of revenue to55.25%. This results in net profit of $78,750 versus $157,475 — a cumulative improvement of 100%. You just doubled your profit!

Of course, this is just a theoretical business and yours will be vastly different from this. However, your business too has these 5 factors. And you can also make small improvements in these areas will net you big improvement to your top and bottom line. More importantly, you can repeat the same process again and again to keep growing your business. Give it a try!

About the Author

By , on Jul 13, 2009
Pinyo is the owner of Moolanomy Personal Finance. He is a licensed Realtor specializing in residential homes in the Northern Virginia area. Over the past 20 years, Pinyo has enjoyed a diverse career as an investor, entrepreneur, business executive, educator, and financial literacy author.

Leave Your Comment (5 Comments)

  1. daveM says:

    This is excellent material for every business, large or small. You have given some excellent techniques, techniques that all should be following.

  2. Pinyo says:

    @Neal – Thank you. That means a lot coming from you. I appreciate it.

  3. Neal says:

    This isn’t a post….this is a book. Dude….fantastic, well written and complete.

    My experience tells me, as a small business owner, the greatest challenge can be taking the time to work ON the business (doing the things you spell out so well) and working IN the business.

    Michael Gerber talks a lot about this in E Myth as you know.

    Your list of suggestions might seem overwhelming to a small business owner but if we just take one step at a time, we can implement all these ideas.

  4. Pinyo says:

    DDFD – Thank you for the feedback.

  5. DDFD says:

    Great advice! Nice to see some positive and constructive thought on the topic of business profitability these days. It can be improved by attacking simple aspects of one’s business as you have demonstrated.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



The information on this site is strictly the author's opinion. It does NOT constitute financial, legal, or other advice of any kind. You should consult with a certified adviser for advice to your specific circumstances.

While we try to ensure that the information on this site is accurate at the time of publication, information about third party products and services do change without notice. Please visit the official site for up-to-date information.

For additional information, please review our legal disclaimers and privacy policy.


Moolanomy has affiliate relationships with some companies ("advertisers") and may be compensated if consumers choose to buy or subscribe to a product or service via our links. Our content is not provided or commissioned by our advertisers. Opinions expressed here are author's alone, not those of our advertisers, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by our advertisers.